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This Teacher’s Pet

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Armitage Teacher's pet 1

It ends today!

I am leaving my summer cottage and going back to the city, and back to work.

There’s always an air of sadness connected to it, but I look forward to starting a new year at work, even though it means getting up at an appalling hour.

It got me thinking about the start of the school year.

How you’d be excited for the first few days, meeting up with friends, catching up, smoking cigarettes in the loo and gossiping.

After the initial enthusiasm passed, you’d be faced with 9 months of utter hassle and boredom, counting down the days for summer to come again.

I guess I was considered a bit of a bad girl at school.

Armitage board

I loathed it there, couldn’t stand the process and spent most of time coming up with ways to make in bearable, like cutting corners, cutting classes, smoking in the loo.

It wasn’t until my final year of secondary school, and then at university, that I actually gave a damn and my dad still think it’s hilarious that I’m a constant student and I teach people for a living.

Believe me, I see the irony in it🙂

Armitage geek kopia

I was wondering what type of pupil Richard was.

We know he was shy, so I doubt he hung out with the “cool crowd”.

He doesn’t seem particularly geeky or overly bookish, so I don’t think he was a nerd.

Maybe he started smoking in secondary school too and would sneak off behind the bike shed for a puff.

What do you think?

All I can say is that maybe if the boys at school looked anything like Richard, I would have actually stopped by there more often😉

About AgzyM

"I have measured out my life with coffee spoons". A fangirl through and through, anglophile, and admirer of beauty whereever I can find it. I love books and art, and spend too much time admiring Richard Armitage and other amazing British actors.

39 responses »

  1. Having seen some photos of a much younger RA, I definitely don’t think he was one of the ‘cool’ kids, and he doesn’t come across as someone who’d chase that kind of popularity. I’m sure he paid attention in English and Music lessons, but I could see him maybe getting distracted and daydreamy in subjects that didn’t engage him. Not a bad boy by any means, but could’ve been one who had ‘needs to focus more in class’ on his report.

    I see from your sidebar what you’re currently watching- let me know what you think! Chris Lilley who created and acted in the show has just announced he’s going to do a follow up series which has been sold to HBO. Let me know in future if you want more recs- happy to oblige ( if you don’t think I have lousy taste that is!)

    What do you teach, Agzy, if you don’t mind revealing?

    Reply
    • I find that the pupil categories are dictated by what we see on American TV shows and the “high school” experience, so I’m not sure how that translates to other countries. He was definitely into arts, probably enjoyed music classes etc. I hope he hated maths as much as I did/do🙂
      Re Summer Heights High, there a whole post scheduled for tomorrow on the subject, but let me thank you by saying it was such a good rec🙂

      Reply
      • Didn’t RA tell in an interview a couple of years ago, that he probably most likely would’ve become an architect, if it wouldn’t have worked out for him as an actor. That sounds like a lot of math to me!!!! And accuracy, diligence and precision! (That’s him, isn’t it??) LOL

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        • The news that Richard might be good at maths worries me😉 You don’t usually see it in arty people. Unless his artsy side would design an amazing house and his lack of math skills would make it come all tumbling down😉

          Reply
          • Actors always nominate alternative careers they wouldn’t have had a snowballs chance in hell of getting on the course for in reality. Didn’t RA get A levels in music and English?

            I wouldn’t worry too much about him being a maths genius Agzy..

          • Not only actors. My sister has this running joke of saying” I’d be a stunning spy, I’d be a stunning ballet dancer, I’d be a stunning high fashion model…
            It reminds me of P&P when Darcy’s annoying aunt claims she would have been a superb piano player had she ever learned. Didn’t stop her commenting on everyone else’s technique and piano skills😉
            BTW, I’d be a stunning architect and mathematician!

          • Richard seems to have a pretty good balance between analytical and artistic. Whether he needs a calculator for most things remains to be seen, but if he adds well in his head then it certainly hasn’t hurt him as an artist. He seems pretty Right-brained to me as an actor/musician/dancer (and writer, if you’ve read “those” letters), but then there is that tenacious researcher and in-depth character analysis he does that screams Left-brain.

            Case in point, I was horrible when it came to math & took forever to memorize Times-Tables. Let’s not even discuss Algebra (please) – which is a far as I would venture beyond basic math. Then what did I choose to do later in life? Bookkeeping and some Tax Accounting. Go figure. (Hated it by the way, but I can do it and it made me a living for a while.) But I think of myself as a creative sort, so I do think it is truly possible to have a decent right brain/left brain balance. The jury is still out however as to which side of my brain is actually dominant – Jill of All Trades, Mistress of None.😦

          • Lucky you! In that case you don’t need Mr. A. to design and construct your dream house as you can do it all by yourself, Seemingly you’re not too convinced about his competency and his calculation skills!! Uh-oh!! (I’m going to tell him!!!!!!!)😆

          • LOL! I may doubt his skills a little but look on the bright side, at least his pretty😉 (that’s what I tell my sister when she does something dumb: At least you’re pretty…)

      • He said in an interview that he was “horrid at maths.”

        Reply
  2. You didn’t answer Katharine’s question. On purpose or oversight?

    Reply
    • LOL, oversight caused by excitement that Katharine askes about “Summer”😉
      I reach Business English in corporations and government institutions. Nothing fancy, but it suits my personality and I enjoy it very much. I guess I do my bit to make sure English is the international language🙂

      Reply
      • So do you go to their workplace, or they come to you? I presume they have good basic English skills already and you give them a more specialised vocab? I was hoping you were going to teach ‘ fandom 101- a guide for dummies’!

        Reply
        • For the past few years I’ve been teaching in just one corporation, so I’m lucky not to have to shift from place to place. Best still, I get to leave a lot earlier than anyone else😉
          I teach people at various levels, I favour upper-intermediate and advanced students because I’m so chatty and I have an English only policy during my class which is tough with elementary students.
          The post on wordpress is coming, it just needs to be right and it was thesis deadline yesterday, so all of my energy went into that. It is coming though, and hopefully one on BlogSpot too🙂

          Reply
          • No, no- I meant ‘fandom basics’ as your teaching job. That’d be fun, right! Fingers crossed for your thesis.

          • LOL I’m all over the shop today. It’s my first day back to work tomorrow after the summer holidays and I’m suffering from a case of scatterbrains😉

  3. I remember reading an interview with a girl who was in his class when he was about 12 (just before he went to the theatre school). She said he wasn’t shy then – she said he was popular with both the boys and the girls and got on with everyone. Apparently he was a bit of a joker in class but clever enough to get away with it. She thought he was good at sport and quite musical…

    There is a class photo somewhere on the internet showing them both. She dug it out after she had had a conversation with a friend about the gorgeous actor playing Guy of Gisborne. When her friend said his name was Richard Armitage she said “I went to school with a boy called Richard Armitage..”

    Reply
  4. Focusing on your question regarding sneak smoking: I could picture him doing that, yeah, if he started in High School. But I have always wondered how others began or decided to smoke? For Richard, if I were to venture a guess though, I’d bet it was while at the circus. High School is usually peer related, and he might have been as impressionable as any of us – which I believe more now after reading that blog post of a classmate interview there. Very nice!🙂

    But what I wonder more is when he quit. I only smoked socially, and only later in my 20’s – 30’s when attempting to socialize at clubs or bars. It was usually at the end of the night when the bar was at its smokiest and when I had had a few…or to meet someone. The smoking ban in bars & restaurants helped put an end to that here in LA, for which I am grateful really. Although I never really got attached to it, I enjoyed it still, but didn’t actually consider myself a “smoker”. Being a non-smoking now, it is unbearable now for me to be around I’m afraid.

    Sounds like you mike still be a sneak smoker, hm? 😉

    Reply
    • I think smoking is also an “actor” thing, although as with any other field, it’s becoming passé. I’m surprised at the amount of actors who smoke, they’re usually snapped having a sneaky cigarette on the sly, proving that it really isn’t something anyone wants to be attached to. It’s just not the “cool” image anymore, and good for that!
      We have a smoking ban throughout the EU, here included, and I honestly can’t remember what it was like to sit in a bar and restaurant and smoke. I was surprised that in many European airports they’ve gotten rid of those “smoking aquariums”. They stank anyway😉

      Reply
      • I don’t know whether we mean the same thing, but when I was a student, there was a glass shelter outside of the university building. We always called it, very affectionately, “ape cage”… and really, there were similarities!

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        • LOL, in Britain many schools have this little construction that protects parked bikes, that’s what I had in mind. It’s often a place for naughty smoking or mingling with the opposite sex. We didn’t have one but would just smoke in the bathroom. Smoking among students got so bad that the main door to the girls loo was taken off the hinges. Those were the days…😉

          Reply
      • Wow, that concept sounds horrible. *cringes* Yeah, I guess that would smell pretty bad.

        Re smoky clubs/bars – for a very short while nostalgia made me miss the smoky atmosphere and smell, somewhat – that haziness somehow recalling the “fog” of love (now so cliche in many a classic film).

        In Los Angeles, there really is not many public places to smoke for those who still do. Occasionally you will see an outdoor area designated, but they are now moving them further and further away from buildings and public places. This is probably also having a psychological effect on those who smoke, making them feel isolated. That sounds bad, but I think the reverse was probably true for a long time – especially from the 40’s through the 70’s, where smoking was everywhere and if you didn’t you either felt left out, or couldn’t visit public places due to allergies, etc., or simply just became a smoker from second-hand addiction. So – yeah, different times.

        Reply
      • And about the “sneak” smoking – Benedict would sneak smoke for a while, but I think he gave up hiding it. Fassbender is pretty blatantly open about it, deliberately posing with it in photo shoots and at certain functions – and possibly just ignoring Publicists, etc. 😉

        Reply
        • I for one find a sexy man smoking attractive, especially when it’s an artsy photoshoot. Having said that, I’ve only even dated one man who smoked, so it doesn’t really translate into RL. Fassbender has a bad boy image to uphold, he’s in the press for drinking, partying and being a bit of a playboy and it’s done his career good. I can’t see him going vegetarian, settling down and leading a “clean” life. BTW, have you seen him in Shame?

          Reply
          • Are you kidding?! Brilliant job, that film…and so is his penis. Although, I wouldn’t let that enormous thing near me – I’m a shallow gal, if you know what I mean.😉

            I think I will see any film Steve McQueen directs, especially if it has Fassbender. Looking forward to 12 Years A Slave!

          • I was particularly impressed with the fact that he managed to wee on cue a handful of times for several different shots.
            And I agree, that’s one anaconda I’m not letting anywhere near my jungle!

          • I heard him say in an interview that “peeing on camera” had hurt his career for a bit, or something to that affect. Then again “peeing on camera” might be a metaphor for baring everything, including audaciously exposing an ugly side of human sexuality as it relates to addiction. Yes, I think that is what he meant.

          • 😉 it’s one of those films that leaves you gobsmacked and yet you need to learn more. It takes balls (no pun intended) to bare it all for the camera and I couldn’t help thinking that maybe some parts of the script weren’t such a big stretch for Michael, the naughty boy that he is😉
            Some may watch the film and see only graphic sex scenes and weirdness, but there’s so much more to it than that.

          • Exactly. And because Steve McQueen asked. I think if Steve asks, Michael jumps. Hunger is brilliant also. And just as hard to watch, but for different reasons.

            You may not agree here, but I found Shame hard to watch in ways that maybe others didn’t – which I think was the Director’s intent. As the film progressed, and as with the nudity in Angels in America (although brief), I found it difficult to sexualize a naked, sick “boy”.

          • Agreed, there was so little sex(y) in the sex. We watched the downward spiral of a sick and lost man who just happened to express his issues by being addicted to p*rn. I spent the entire movie really hoping we wouldn’t get a disturbing storyline involving the sister which made it difficult to watch for me.

          • I think it was certainly more than hinted at, right there. MORE than. And maybe not even just him, but parental abuse as well. The pain was very deep between those two. But to be honest, I think it was parental…and possibly for both. And the title means many things in respect to that, such as not being able to protect a sibling from such abuse…or neglecting to…or just plain self-blame for it happening, period. The scene while they watch cartoons is significant. It represents a reflection to their childhood, hinting at what might lie underneath. And the irony when (and audacity of) he confronts her about her issues with men. I wanted to smack him, but also realized that he is projecting – angry that her pain reflects his. Lots of nuances in that movie about all the things that go unsaid between people who really love each other. Brilliant.

  5. Pingback: Richard Armitage Legenda 97: Stuff worth reading | Me + Richard Armitage

  6. Great article but it didn’t have ev-rgthinyeI didn’t find the kitchen sink!

    Reply

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